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CIO Scott Martin Interviewed on Fox Business News 7.28.21 Pt 1

Program: Cavuto Coast to Coast
Date: 7/28/2021
Station: Fox News Channel
Time: 12:00PM

DAVID ASMAN: But first, inflation and inflation, is it permanent or transitory? That is the question the Fed is debating as we speak right now. We’ll hear about their decisions coming up. But markets are on edge, waiting to hear whether the central bank will pull back on its money printing sprint. Our all star panel is here, Kingsview Asset Management CIO Scott Martin, Fox Business correspondent Susan Li, and Through the Cycle, president and founder John Lonski. A great panel. Thank you all for being here. So, Susan, what are the markets expecting? They seem not to not to be too certain about what’s going to come up.

SUSAN LI: Yeah, well, what does transitory mean? Because before you’ve heard the Federal Reserve say maybe two to three months and now is it for the rest of this year? We know that inflation has run hot now for the past three months. You have a five percent increase in prices, consumer prices, the fastest, two thousand eight. So I guess the discussion is when do they take away the punch? Bowl is a twenty, twenty two. And then do you get the first interest rate increase in twenty, twenty three? I think the markets are passing and looking for some sort of wording from Jay Powell later on today.

ASMAN: Scott, which way. You bet.

SCOTT MARTIN: Expecting not much, David, actually, I think the real news is going to come out in the Jackson Hole meeting in a few weeks here, but I’ll tell you what else is going on here, David, is you talk about this transitory notion of inflation. Susan’s right. The setup is exactly correct. It was a couple of months and now it’s several months. And as long as they keep using that word along the line, I guess it’s still transitory. And I’ll tell you, interest rate projections are hard to handicap right now because we’ve got softening economic growth coming down the pike here in Q4 and Q1 of next year, which probably puts off the rate hike at least another six months into two thousand twenty two.

ASMAN: Well, John, earnings, of course, are looking in the rearview mirror, but we have these spectacular earnings yesterday, almost 60 billion dollars between three companies, Microsoft, Apple and Google or Alphabet, as it’s now called. So you had these spectacular earnings from the high tech companies. You still have a lot of demand out there. There’s this pent up demand. People with a lot of cash, they want to spend it. But you have a labor shortage. You have you have inflation. You have certain pushbacks on supply, supply chain, mess ups and and strangulations going on. So. So what’s your bet on what the economy is going to be doing in the months to come?

JOHN LONSKI: I think the economy’s going to slow down. We have had a number of downward revisions for predictions of economic growth during the second half of this year. You know, we had, for instance, GDP now by the Atlanta Fed earlier. They thought that the second quarter and we’re going to get a report tomorrow on second quarter GDP, the second quarter GDP growing by something faster than 10 percent. Since then, that forecast has been lowered to seven point four percent. Basically, David, what is happening is that price inflation, higher prices are beginning to take their toll of household expenditures. The best example, housing. New home sales in June were a disaster, down nearly seven percent monthly, down 19 percent from a year ago, despite still very low interest rates. I think the Fed is quickly finding that it’s going to be between a rock and a hard place. If it hikes rates to try to cool inflation, it will hurt the economy. If it does nothing faster, price inflation will lead to pullbacks by consumer spending.

ASMAN: But, Susan, they’re going to have to rewrite their mandates, if that’s true, because they have two major mandates. One is for price stability. As we talked about, there isn’t much price stability right now. Inflation is going up. There are even signs that it could be double digit next year if if that’s conceivable that we could go back to the late 70s. And the second mandate is on unemployment. Well, we have nine point three million unfilled jobs. Yes. They might not be paying as much as the government is for unemployment benefits. But the point is we don’t have an unemployment problem right now. So is the government just getting in the way

LI: And finding the workers to fill those jobs? And they also say that there’s a Fed put out there being that there’s a third mandate, which is to protect the stock markets, because a lot of people on Wall Street says that if we see the stock market fall 10 percent, you bet the Fed will step in at some point, as we saw in the depths of March last year, which they should have done. But, yeah, there are concerns that right now maybe the economy is running too hot. There are a lot of jobs out there, not the right people to fill it. And maybe it is time to take away the punchbowl. Now, if you take away stimulus, it doesn’t mean you can’t be reinstated once you see some sort of slowdown or some sort of hiccups in the economy.

ASMAN: But but but right now and again, Scott, it has to be the last word. I’m sorry, John. We’ll get back to you. We’ll start with you the next round. But but the fact is, is that we have the government just getting in the way of this amazing emergence from from all of the lockdown’s, which was creating all this spectacular growth. I’m wondering if the government is causing more problems than they’re solving right now

MARTIN: For sure, David. And creating new problems every day. It’s the classic case of government knows best. Government knows how to do best with your money, not you, yourself, the business owner or the spender. And that’s really where I think we’re at this crossroads here, because the Fed has done what they needed to do. The government has gotten in the way and created more inflationary pressure. And they seem to keep doing that with some of these crazy spending packages that have yet to be passed through Congress.

ASMAN: A panel this good should not be missed in their second round, which is coming up later in the hour. Good to see you guys.

5:30

CIO Scott Martin Interviewed on Fox Business News 7.28.21 Pt 2

Program: Cavuto Coast to Coast
Date: 7/28/2021
Station: Fox News Channel
Time: 12:00PM

DAVID ASMAN: Well, meanwhile, Beijing’s crackdown on US listed stocks is fueling a record drop in those stocks. Let’s bring back Scott Martin. Susan Lee and John Lonski. Good to see you all. Susan, what is going on in China right now? I mean, President Xi is a communist, even though he’s allowed you know, he sits where he does because of the sort of free market pushes of his predecessors. Is he going back to the old a stricter communist model of dealing with the economy?

SUSAN LI: Well, if you ever go to China, you’ll see it’s actually a very capitalist society. People there just want to make money and make their lives better. But there’s a lot of debate in terms of what exactly is a long term goal of Beijing and Xi Jinping and the Communist Party. Because really, when you’re clamping down on big technology like they have been in the last few months, you’re really cutting off your nose to spite your own face. Right. So what is a long term goal? Is it just domination, control over data, over the economy, over the markets? Or do you want your home grown talent to make lives better for the billion people that live in the country? I think there’s a lot of debate about that. But I will say that Bitcoin has actually benefited from this clampdown. A lot of money has been taken out of these Chinese stocks and worse two day wipeout since, two thousand eight. That money has gone into other assets, speculative assets like Bitcoin, John.

ASMAN: So far, the Bush administration hasn’t really changed that much. The policy of the Trump administration, one of those rare things where it hasn’t undone the good stuff that his predecessor did. But do you think that will last or do you think we may have sort of relations with China that perhaps a lot of people would would would voice their opinions against?

JOHN LONSKI: Well, I think the Biden administration will continue to take a critical view of what is taking place in China with the intentions might be they will be very wary of attempts by Chinese companies to purchase U.S. companies. And Susan, I think put it quite well. The Chinese government appears to be shooting itself in the foot. I mean, they have a very creative, innovative, highly educated population that could do wonders at creating wealth for China. And yet they seem to be putting limits on the ability of the Chinese economy to grow. And this brings up an important point. You know, years ago, the 1950s, high ranking U.S. academics, Paul Samuelson made the argument that the Soviet Union would surpass the US economic never came close to happening now. And the more you try to stifle initiative in an economy, the less likely is the economy to reach its full potential.

ASMAN: Well, Scott, on the other hand, you see all those people there at one point, four billion of them, and companies like Coca-Cola and the others at Nike that have their their fingers all over the place are willing to forgive all of the problems that China has. They’re willing to kowtow to the Chinese Communist Party to to maintain their market share in China. But and this is a very important but that I want you to deal with. You have the issue of the pandemic. We will not forget where the pandemic came from. We will not forget the way they unleashed it by allowing the people from move to travel to Europe and to travel to us and infect the rest of the world and perhaps perhaps having invented it inside a lab. Won’t there be repercussions from that that will affect economically our relations with China?

SCOTT MARTIN: Well, there should be, David. I mean, I’m waiting for the administration every day to do something about what happened in the Wuhan lab a little over a year ago. And certainly if you look going forward and based on history, you can’t trust China, whether it’s economically, whether it’s medically. We don’t have a friend there, obviously. And if you look at back, you know, earlier this month, they had the hundred year celebration, I guess it was, of the CCP, which was highly their militaristic. It was highly affronted to the rest of the world as some of the comments that President Xi made versus the other rest of the world leaders and rest of the world countries about what the Chinese government was going to do to people. And so, look, going forward, if we think we’ve got a friend in China, we’re sorely mistaken and it’s already costing them internally. Yes, a lot of money as far as how they’re clamping down on their own, their own companies, but also what it’s doing to some of our companies that are trying to get in there and do business

ASMAN: Susan,John Scott, what a great panel. Thank you all for being here. Appreciate it. Well, it’s one of the.

4:27

Portfolio Manager Insights | Weekly Investor Commentary – 7.28.21

Click here for the full commentary.

PORTFOLIO MANAGER INSIGHTS
WEEKLY INVESTOR COMMENTARY | 7.28.21
Investment Committee

As the economy shifts from recovery to expansion, one challenge for investors continues to be the high level of valuations. In the long run, valuations are investors’ best North Star since they don’t just tell us how much something costs, but also what we get for our money. They are correlated with portfolio returns for this reason – i.e., buying when the market is cheap improves the odds of success, and vice versa. After a spectacular recovery, what can investors expect in the years to come?

The most important thing for investors to remember is that valuations are a much better indicator of whether investments are attractive than prices alone. Prices can rise over long periods of time, just as they have for the U.S. stock market over the past century, despite bear markets and short-term corrections. Comparing prices today to previous peaks and troughs doesn’t consider differences between these time periods. Valuations, on the other hand, “normalize” prices by some important measure such as sales, earnings or cash flow. This adjustment makes prices more comparable over time to determine whether an asset class, sector or individual investment is attractive.


Long-run valuations are near historic peaks

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

1. Measures such as the Shiller P/E ratio, which uses ten years of inflation-adjusted earnings in the denominator, are near historic levels. This and similar valuation measures are correlated with long-run portfolio returns.
2. However, it’s possible for these measures to improve (i.e. decline) as earnings and other fundamentals catch up to prices.

Today, various measures of value are at or near all-time highs not just for publicly traded stocks, but across a variety of asset classes. This is because the bull market has boosted prices faster than fundamentals over the past year. The closely watched price-to-earnings ratio using next-twelve-month earnings estimates is hovering around 21.6x, not far from the tech bubble peak of 24.5x. The Shiller P/E ratio, also known as the cyclically-adjusted P/E since it uses ten years of inflation-adjusted earnings, is also elevated at 38x.

This same pattern can be found across a wide variety of valuations measures, from price-to-sales to dividend yields. Across asset classes, especially public equities, there are very few areas that are “cheap” in absolute terms today.


This is true across measures as fundamentals improve

KEY TAKEAWAY:

1. There are few valuation measures that are cheap across publicly traded stocks and other asset classes. Many measures are near historic levels going back to the early 2000’s.

While investors should be aware of these facts and may find it prudent to make some portfolio adjustments, there are a few reasons investors shouldn’t completely overhaul their plans. First, while valuations are helpful tools for evaluating the attractiveness of investments, they do not predict market behavior in the short run. Markets can continue to rise or fall regardless of valuations for long periods of time, especially during the earlier stages of a bull market when the underlying trends are positive.

Second, why valuations are high matters. While prices have certainly risen, valuations such as P/Es are elevated because fundamentals are still catching up. As earnings accelerate, P/E’s can moderate to more reasonable levels. On their own, P/E ratios don’t tell us whether it’s prices that will fall or earnings that will rise. In reality, the latter is already occurring as companies and consumers spend more.


Diversified portfolios can benefit from more attractive regions and asset classes

KEY TAKEAWAY:

1. It’s important for investors to stay diversified in this environment since other regions and asset classes may provide more value than U.S. stocks alone.

Third, in an environment in which all asset classes are increasingly expensive and the value of cash is eroding due to inflation, staying diversified is still the best approach for long-term investors. Other asset classes including fixed income and international stocks can still help improve returns and lower portfolio volatility even if their valuations are also above average.

Where valuations go from here will be important for the direction of long run returns. However, investors should continue to stay invested and diversified as the cycle shifts from a recovery phase to an expansionary one. As portfolios benefit from the ongoing bull market, it’s also important for investors to stay invested and diversified to manage elevated valuations.

Historical references do not assume that any prior market behavior will be duplicated. Past performance does not indicate future results. This material has been prepared by Kingsview Wealth Management, LLC. It is not, and should not, be regarded as investment advice or as a recommendation regarding any particular security or course of action. Opinions expressed herein are current opinions as of the date appearing in this material only. All investments entail risks. There is no guarantee that investment strategies will achieve the desired results under all market conditions and each investor should evaluate their ability to invest for the long term. Investment advisory services offered through Kingsview Wealth Management, LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Adviser.

3:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 7.26.21

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses portfolio allocations in light of Beijing’s regulatory crackdowns.

Click here for the full article

3:00

CIO Scott Martin Interviewed on Fox Business News 7.27.21

Program: Your World with Cavuto
Date: 7/272021
Station: Fox News Channel
Time: 4:00PM

SANDRA SMITH: Choppers still taking a bite out of Apple, the tech giant blowing through earnings and sales expectations, including big iPhone sales. The stock is little change in the after hours, but what is this telling us about the state of the US economy, the global economy, I should say? Let’s talk to our money guy, Scott Martin. I mean, record profits, dollar 30 a share, a record quarter record, June, record quarter, I mean, sales. One hundred and ninety four billion in cash. And by the way, Tim Cook is also confirming that return to office has been delayed to October and possibly later. So they’re doing all this while so many people are still working from home. I mean, Apple just keeps winning.

SCOTT MARTIN: They keep winning like Charlie Sheen once was, Sandra. And I’ll tell you what I mean. The numbers are outstanding, like you mentioned. I’ll throw in another one to record numbers for iPhone sales. Five billion, by the way, Sandra, ahead of what the street expected, five billion sports fans ahead in revenue. So, I mean, the estimates can’t even be high enough for Apple yet. You made a really good point, Sindarin. You this from your experience in the market, the market’s flat, the apple prices is flat. The stock price, rather, after hours is flat. And some of the other companies that came out like Google, Microsoft, others are kind of flattish. Same thing as well, because they’re already expected. Yeah, these are expectations that are built in this market. So be careful if you’re out there buying these stocks as an investor.

SANDRA SMITH: So while we’re all complaining about higher prices of our groceries or fuel, certainly we’re not letting the six hundred dollar iPhone bother us. There are still buying that. What does that say about the state of the economy?

SCOTT MARTIN: Well, I would love to find a six hundred dollar iPhone because, I mean, the last one I bought, this one right here was like a thousand and five. I mean, look at you know, there’s refurbished. That’s exactly right. The lower models, which, by the way, every time they do an upgrade on the iOS or a new iPhone comes out, that other model gets stupider, it seems like. But here’s the point. You’re right. It just do an experiment. If you go out today or go out tonight, walk around and see how many people are glued to their phones, where they’re walking around or in their cars driving. It’s unbelievable how these things are basically an extension of our arms and legs here. So the fact is these are integrated more than ever into our lives via the service revenue, too, by the way, which is another great number in today’s earnings report for Apple service. Revenue was about a billion ahead of street expectations as well. So that’s like the the Apple music, the Apple Arcade, things like that cloud. So, Sandra, the fact is, Apple is the biggest part of our lives, really, that we probably have as far as tech companies go. And they’re just going to keep on crushing

SANDRA SMITH: it and they crushed it. And I have to tell you, there’s an Apple and Grand Central here. And while Grand Central still half empty because there’s still not as many trains, there is still a line to get in the Apple store there. They stop you. If you don’t have a mass, they hand you a max, they line you up the stairs like this. And I mean, people just keep buying them. So that turned up in the earnings. Great to see you, Scott. Fellow Chicagoans. Thank you. So you all right after.

3:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 7.20.21

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses the Delta variant’s potential effect on economic reopening.

Click here for the full article

3:00

Kingsview Partners Welcomes Misty House as Chief Operations Officer

Kingsview Partners is pleased to welcome Misty House as our new Chief Operations Officer. As the COO, Misty’s chief mandate is to ensure the operational integrity of Kingsview and all the firm’s subsidiary businesses. This requires her to be proficient in nearly every aspect of the firm’s activities and partner with department heads and the firm’s wealth managers to improve operational workflows and enhance the end-user experience.

Misty comes to Kingsview Partners with over 28 years of experience in the business world. She has spent her career in multiple financial services, including accounting, mortgage, investment and insurance, with the last ten years in an executive capacity.

Misty’s knowledge of the public and corporate accounting arenas, along with her Accounting and Total Quality Management degrees, serve as the foundation for her business management expertise. She credits her ability to navigate complex situations and personal relationships in order to create efficient systems and increase the bottom line to her years of experience in various service industries. She is a leadership and efficiency expert and has studied the concepts of Six Sigma and process improvement for the last 20 years.

When not at the office, Misty enjoys traveling and appreciating the great outdoors with her husband, James, and their boys, Isaac and Jonah. She also enjoys painting and volunteering for local charities such as Hearts with a Mission, a teen homeless shelter.

Click here to view Misty’s Bio

1:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed on WGN Radio 7.15.21

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses weekly jobless claims, how long it will take to return to 2019 employment numbers, and the market reaction to jobless claims, earnings reports and Chairman Powell’s Congressional testimony.

Click here to listen to the interview

4:45

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 7.14.21

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses why Powell is sticking to the “inflation is transitory” script.

Click here for the full article

3:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 7.14.21 Pt. 2

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses the rotation back in to large growth.

Click here for the full article

3:00