SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed on WGN Radio 9.14.21

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses the inflation rate, this week’s declining market, and why investors are heading back to technology.

Click here to listen to the interview.

6:44

CIO Scott Martin Interviewed on Fox Business News 9.1.21

Kingsview CIO Scott Martin discusses the variance in data points – job numbers, consumer confidence, PMI, and inflation.

Program: Mornings with Maria
Date: 9/1/2021
Station: Fox Business News
Time: 6:00 AM

DAGEN MCDOWELL: Time for the word on Wall Street. Top investors watching your money. Joining me now, Kingsview Wealth Management Chief Investment Officer, Fox News contributor Scott Martin, UBS Financial Services Private Wealth Advisor Alli McCartney, and Strategic Wealth Partners president and CEO Marc Tepper. Good to see all of you this morning. Scott, let me kick it off with you. We’re standing by for a weekly jobless claims out at eight thirty a.m. Eastern Time. Investors, of course, also waiting on the August jobs report due out tomorrow. The expectation there, seven hundred fifty thousand jobs added to the economy. The unemployment rate ticking down to five point two percent. Scott, what are you watching for?

SCOTT MARTIN: It all sounds awesome, doesn’t it? And I think these days is as untapped. That’s Mark Tepper. If you’re playing at home, if talked about all morning. There’s a lot of variance in these data points now. It’s just not the jobs numbers. It’s consumer confidence numbers. It’s PMI. It’s even inflation. My goodness. So the reality is this, Deighan, I think the market is ready for, say, a stinker to use a technical term here in the job market, because it’s not all bad news, boys and girls, because what that means is that kids, I think we go back to Mark annd I’s, say high school football days when we were stud’s, I think. Right, Mark, this is the lead block that the Fed needs going forward to keep that stimulus train going. If we start getting stinky again, to use that word, jobs numbers here, that allows the Fed to keep the spigot going as far as liquidity to the markets.

MCDOWELL: When you’re talking about the Fed, Scott, before we move on, in terms of the political pressure on Jay Powell, I just wonder and Tep can get in on this later as well. I just wonder, though, that won’t the spigot stay wide open because maybe Jay Powell wants to get another, you know, another term. Just real quick on that.

MARTIN: Yeah, another handful of years. Yeah, totally. And I think that’s the interesting thing is maybe Jay Powell is actually hoping for some disappointing economic numbers so he can justify the liquidy. But let’s face it, I mean, either maybe maybe they’re into the taper as soon as they think or maybe they don’t do the interest rate hikes as soon as they think. What are the other is not going to happen. So as far as the job numbers are concerned, I think the Fed has been right down the middle of the fairway. Another sports analogy. Yes, it’s early with respect to how they’re treating these markets and giving the markets what they need and what they expect. And that’s why we’re at or near all time highs in the S&P Nasci.

MCDOWELL: Yeah, I dare you to work in a cricket analogy. And next time you come on, Ali, I want to move on to you here. Let’s talk about consumer confidence. August, consumer confidence falling to its lowest level since February. And at the same time, we have companies like Costco announcing it’s going to reinstate purchasing limits on select items because people, again, are stockpiling goods as Covid cases. Serj, put this in perspective from a market or investor standpoint.

ALLI MCCARTNEY: Yeah. There’ll be no sports analogies here, I promise I couldn’t if I tried. Maybe lacrosse. I don’t know how that works. So, look, let’s go back to last March when the recovery in the market at least was was really heightened. And we said bull market participants said this is not going to be a straight line recovery. And the truth is that between now and then and very recently, it has been largely both in terms of earnings market numbers and economic information, pretty much a straight line recovery. And now we sit at this inflection point where a lot of the things that we were concerned about that were those downside risks have surfaced. We have a variant that is taxing hospitals and concerning both consumers and producers. Yet again, we have severe weather. We have back to school and we are past peak earnings. And so I think what a lot of the numbers that we’ve been seeing, both the ADP numbers we got yesterday, which were, you know, have 60 percent of what we were hoping for in terms of additional payrolls. I think the jobs number that we get tomorrow will reflect this as well. And consumer confidence, which we did get yesterday, which is the lowest number we’ve seen since February, which think about it, that was like the ramp up of both confidence in the vaccination program. So we’re now sitting at this low where consumers aren’t having checks deposited into their accounts where everybody was, at least where I am in New

York, the thought was everybody would be going back to New York in July and August in September. A lot of that has now been pushed forward as a result of the Delta variant into January. So we have sort of gone like this, and now we’re going to be here for a bit. And I think once we see the Delta variant, once we have a sense of how, quote unquote temporary or transient inflation is, once we have infrastructure kicking off and some more clarity in Washington, I think you will see another leg up

MCDOWELL: your dogs behind you, Ali, and we just love it.

MCCARTNEY: He hears you talking about dogs and there is nothing I can do.

MCDOWELL: It’s been a morning for everybody here in the Northeast. So we love seeing our fluffy little ones. Mark, we briefly mentioned the Fed before. Progressive lawmakers are calling on President Biden to replace Fed Chair Jay Powell, who has been campaigning for reappointment. Meantime, in a new Wall Street Journal op ed, Judy Shelton calls on Congress to rein in the Federal Reserve, calling its power unchecked. Your thoughts on the future of the Fed? And my issue is progressives putting pressure on Jay Powell to be more tough, particularly on financial regulations, banking regulation. I just think that it adds a real uncertainty, not maybe about the role of the Fed that investors might be underestimating.

MARK TEPPER: Yes, absolutely. So, look, I think the path of least resistance is to reappoint Jay Powell, like my man, ScotI Market said he’s been right down the middle of the fairway. I think he’s done a pretty good job. I disagree with his comments about inflation being transitory. I think it’s going to be a little longer lasting than that. But that’s a different story. When you look at Jay Powell, he’s got public support from senators on both sides of the aisle, even Janet Yellen, who supports his reappointment. And when you when you try to figure out what the market impact is going to be here, I think here’s what investors need to know. If Powell isn’t reappointed, the Fed’s going to become even more dovish. So that should continue to prop up stock prices. And right now, it’s essentially a two person race between Powell and Brainard. And dig into your point. Brainard is a left leaning enough that she could potentially transform the Fed’s mandate. Right now, it’s all about full employment and price stability. She could align the Fed more with Biden’s priorities on financial regulation and, of course, racial equality. Climate change. Right. But at the end of the day, here’s what I think happens. I think Powell gets reappointed. I think Brainard gets elevated to vice chair so that there’s some extra influence there. And I think you’ll end up getting more regulation in the financial system, probably a bit bearish for financials and crypto. But I think more of the same for everyone else.

MCDOWELL: Thank you so much, Mark. You sit right there, Scott Martin and Alli Macartney, thank you so much for being with us this morning. And hold that dog close, Ali. Much more ahead

MARTIN: Tell him about the Chewy earnings.

MCDOWELL: Yeah, exactly. Much more ahead this morning.

7:33

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 8.20.21

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses the global economy’s growth outlook and Fed tapering.

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2:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 7.26.21

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses portfolio allocations in light of Beijing’s regulatory crackdowns.

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3:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 7.20.21

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses the Delta variant’s potential effect on economic reopening.

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3:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 7.14.21

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses why Powell is sticking to the “inflation is transitory” script.

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3:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 7.14.21 Pt. 2

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses the rotation back in to large growth.

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3:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 7.7.21

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses recent bond market signals and what that might mean for technology.

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3:00

SVP Paul Nolte Interviewed By Reuters 6.8.21

Reuters interviews Paul Nolte, SVP & Sr. Portfolio Manager

Kingsview SVP Paul Nolte discusses the current “waiting game” and monetary policy.

Click here for the full article

3:00

CIO Scott Martin Interviewed on Fox Business News 6.2.21 Pt 1

Kingsview CIO Scott Martin discusses the great reopening, global supply chains, and what pricing pressures mean for small businesses.

Program: Cavuto Coast to CoastDate: 6/2/2021
Station: Fox Business News
Time: 12:00PM

NEIL CAVUTO: Want to bring Jared Levy into this Delancey Strategies, President Scott Martin, Kingsview Asset Management. Gentlemen, of course, for this restaurant owner, you can pull all the academic prescriptions you want. It’s making his business a tougher business. And he he he really doesn’t need that coming out of the pandemic where he’s hurt enough just finding labor and finding workers. Now, this. So I’m wondering, Scott, I know a Federal Reserve district president, Philadelphia saying this run up will be short lived, but it’s not short lived. This guy.

SCOTT MARTIN: No, in any short lived period doesn’t feel good to the business owner. I mean, Jeff talked about it with a fella there about he’s losing money on the wings today, hoping they go down in price in the future. I mean, that’s a scary hope to hang your profits on. And that’s something that concerns me, Neil, about this great reopening that’s out there. Yes. Global supply chains hopefully will get back on track and therefore some of that pricing pressure will alleviate. But the mom and pop the small business down the road that competes with the big business in your neighborhood. Those guys and gals don’t have the pricing power with their suppliers that some of the bigger companies have. And so when you look at this re-opening happening and saying, hey, this is going to be great and it’s going to help everybody, as the administration likes to say, it’s probably going to help the big guys more than anything, because the small guys still have a lot of that pressure, as the fellow said, to talk to Jeff about passing on those price increases that they’re seeing from their suppliers.

CAVUTO: Yeah, you know, when you look at this chart and you want to step back and say, let’s hope things calm down, these ransomware spikes or whatever you want to call them, they can’t go on forever. Of course, we’ve seen enough incidents where we’re beginning to wonder how true that is. But but that even the run up we’ve been seeing in a lot of these prices, all of these developments, they were real. The surge in things like car and truck rentals and the haircut, first of all, services, meals, et cetera, that was in place long before any of these attacks. And I’m just wondering if the Federal Reserve, which seems to think it won’t last very long, is wrong on that it’s going to compel them to respond to it or risk falling behind the curve. Right. I mean, so how does it play this?

JARED LEVY: Yeah, this is there’s two pieces here, right? I mean, one, you know, my heart goes out to every small business owner in this country because the key here is, is not the just the price increases. It’s the fact we’re traders. Right? We talk about investing, buying, selling. Remember, these guys have run businesses. You don’t go to your local burger joint and see the burgers swimming up 10 cents, down a dollar, up two dollars. They don’t operate that way. You know, when things get missed, when things get priced or major crisis happen, they reprice and they stay that way. We don’t see a lot of undulation. So the bottom line is these guys are going to have to ratchet up and it’s going to stay that way at the consumer level and at their level if they’re going to stay open. So that’s one problem. You know, and this isn’t a JBS issue. And I’m referencing the Meat-packing company in the meat distribution company. This is a bigger, broader effect that’s taking place around the world. I’m talking about inflation. It’s going to continue. Unfortunately, you’ve got a lot of money stashed away. You’ve got a lot of folks I mean, I can’t get work done on my house. There’s nobody available. People are paying two, three, four times for services to get them done. Now, do you do you correct that with with interest rates immediately? I mean, it’ll shock the marketplace, but I don’t know how a rise in interest rates or policy or even Putin saying don’t hack. You know, hey, guys, don’t don’t nobody do any ransomware attacks. How that’s really going to change things. This is a much longer, bigger arm that’s swinging right now. And frankly, I don’t think that even an extreme jump is going to correct it. So so, again, I don’t think this inflation is short lived. And I think it’s something that’s here to stay. We’re going to have to really adjust and it’s going to take some time.

CAVUTO: Yeah, you know, whether you’re worried about this returning to the 70s type of place, which I think is a bit overwrought, it’s still a trend that’s firmly in place. And on that point, Scott, I’m wondering how the market deals with that. I mean, it seems to recognize that the backdrop for this is strong demand. We’re coming out of our homes. Obviously, bookings are very strong on airlines, one of the best travel weekends we’ve seen since before the pandemic. So the trend is the economy’s front. I get that. But when does the market get or will it respond to this stubborn uptick in prices that might continue for a while?

MARTIN: It’s when the sugar high runs out, Neil, from that euphoric run up of this great reopening that we’ve been anticipating. I mean, I’m in Ohio today and they’ve removed, as you’ve been talking about on the show today, all the mask mandates statewide, which is great. So that provides that sugar high, the excitement for that run up, that demand that you talk about to show up. But when we get there and I think to Jared’s point, when these price increases don’t alleviate, then you kind of stand around and be like, well, now what? Now we need wage increases. Now we need increases in wealth and things like that to start paying for all the increased costs that we’ve seen. And that’s when I think the markets need to really take heart to this. Now, what you will see, though, is in some of the bigger companies like the Starbucks of the world and Netflix, some of the companies we own, Neil, in our portfolios, you’re going to see pricing power there. I mean, companies like those can raise their prices a dollar or two and likely get the buy in from consumers. But those are a select few. And so it basically shakes out not to be sexist, the men from the boys to use that term as to how some companies are going to be able to weather those price increases and the stock prices are not going to suffer versus others that cannot.

CAVUTO: All right, guys, I want to thank. We’re going to have you back a little bit later here.

5:49